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What's Killing My Kale? Episode 12 - Japanese Beetle

How Much Do We Really Know About Japanese Beetles?

Everyone is talking about Japanese beetles this season, but how much do we actually know about how to control them?

In this episode, Extension Educator Jeff Hahn and Entomology graduate student Dominique Ebbenga help me bust some myths about Japanese beetle control. We break down the ins and outs of this invasive pest, and they reveal some fascinating facts about what makes them such a
tough foe for fruits and vegetables in Minnesota.

Listen to this episode here, or on iTunes.

Produced by: Annie Klodd, kloddann@umn.edu
Recent posts

Newcastle Disease Alert

Last week, the Minnesota Board of Animal Health received a report from Michelle Carstensen with the Minnesota DNR that Double-crested Cormorants (DCCO) in Minnesota have been identified with Newcastle Disease (Avian Paramyxovirus-1).  The DCCO mortality began August 7, 2018 at Chautauqua Lake (Lye Lake) in Ottertail County, approximately 5 miles southeast of Fergus Falls, MN. Dead and sick cormorants were on two islands near each other, most birds left the island when approached by boat, most including the young of the year could fly. Approximately 25 of the young of the year could not fly, they could only use one wing. The other wing hung at the side and was not being used. Two were seen in the water and had trouble holding their heads up. Most of the carcasses appeared to be dead for some time. Turkey Vultures were feeding in the area.  Two DCCO were collected on August 7; one was found dead and the other was euthanized by cervical dislocation.  Both of the cormorants submitted wer…

What's Killing My Kale? Episode 11 - Pollinators and IPM Part III

In our August episodes on pollinator and beneficial insect conservation as part of IPM, we'll discuss some background on how pollinators and beneficial insects are faring in our current agricultural systems, how farmers can implement beneficial habitat, and some tips for managing pests without harming beneficial insects. 
In this episode, we're joined by Karin Jokela, Xerces Society Conservation Planner.
As always, please provide feedback so that we can improve our podcast!

What's Killing My Kale? Episode 10 - Pollinators and IPM Part II

In our August episodes on pollinator and beneficial insect conservation as part of IPM, we'll discuss some background on how pollinators and beneficial insects are faring in our current agricultural systems, how farmers can implement beneficial habitat, and some tips for managing pests without harming beneficial insects. 
In this episode, we're joined by Karin Jokela, Xerces Society Conservation Planner.
As always, please provide feedback so that we can improve our podcast!

What's Killing My Kale? Episode 9 - Pollinators and IPM Part 1

In our August episodes on pollinator and beneficial insect conservation as part of IPM, we'll discuss some background on how pollinators and beneficial insects are faring in our current agricultural systems, how farmers can implement beneficial habitat, and some tips for managing pests without harming beneficial insects. 
This week, we're joined by Elaine Evans, UMN native bee expert
As always, please provide feedback so that we can improve our podcast!

What's Killing My Kale? Episode 8 - Trunk Diseases in MN Grapes

In this episode, Annie Klodd, UMN Extension Fruit and Vegetable Production Educator, is discussing trunk diseases of grapes.

For more information on trunk diseases, see http://treeandvinetrunkdiseases.org/. Please remember to provide feedback so that we can improve our podcast! Feedback can be provided at this link.

How do I start a cottage food business?

By Suzanne Driessen Extension food safety educator
Do you have extra produce in your garden? Make the tastiest granola? Perfected jalepeƱo apricot buffalo wing sauce? Why not turn these products into a cottage food business and join the ranks of 2600 Minnesota registered cottage food producers.
Under the 2015 Minnesota Cottage Food law, many shelf stable or unrefrigerated food products made in a home kitchen can be sold to the direct consumer at farmers’ markets and community events. Examples of cottage foods include high-acid, canned food products--preserves, pickles and salsas--and low-moisture baked goods fruit pies, bread, pastries, cakes, cookies and specialty items like candy, dried herbs jam and jelly dry mixes, flavored vinegars and more.
Interested? Here are tips to get started as a cottage food producer (CFP): Learn the provisions of the law.Check out the allowed and not allowed food list here. Stop by your local farmers’ market. What are other CFPs making and selling? What do…